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Math 20
 Pop Quiz #2 

Time for our first graded pop quiz!

Your final exam proves to the world that you have sufficient mastery of the math topics. We do not need to measure topic mastery with quizzes.

Your turn in homework tries to keep you from falling behind in class. These quizzes can also help with that.

Most importantly, this pop quiz checks if you can use our math tools to contribute meaningfully to an open-ended real-life issue.

Rent or Buy a House?

Pick a home location you have experience with. Use our math tools of unit rates, measurement unit conversion, and changing between fraction and percent format to help someone decide whether to rent or buy a home.

Follow the steps below carefully. You paper will be graded on organization, neatness, thoroughness, and producing a meaningful result.

You will not be graded on which numbers you use when estimating real-life costs. You have enough time to do a little research. But focus on your process, not your precision in modeling a specific real-life situation.


1. Estimate at least two monthly costs for renting a house. Estimate at least two monthly costs for buying a house.

Examples can include rent, mortage payments, utilities, renter's insurance, yard service, cleaning, etc.

Including more than two costs for each of renting/buying will help the "thoroughness" part of your grade.

2. Estimate at least two non-monthly costs for renting a house. Estimate at least two non-monthly costs for buying a house.

Examples can include appliance maintenance, pressure washing, snow removal, firewood, tree removal, roofing, carpets, homeowner's insurance, etc.

Including more than two costs for each of renting/buying will help the "thoroughness" part of your grade.

3. Convert all of your cost estimates to monthly amounts.

Work carefully to get these monthly unit rates. Use a calculator if needed.

Keep the renting and buying information distinct to help the "organized" part of your grade. Work step-by-step to help the "neatness" part of your grade.

4. Total those mothly costs for renting a house. Total those mothly costs for buying a house.

Use a calculator if needed. Keep the renting and buying information distinct to help the "organized" part of your grade.

5. Write as a fraction the ratio of the smaller total to the larger total.

This ratio was created from real-life information and should not be simplified.

Label the ratio carefully to help the "organized" part of your grade.

6. Change that fraction into percent format.

Percent format can be useful to summarize a lot of information in one number.

Explain the meaning of the percentage carefully to help the "organized" part of your grade.

7. Write a concluding paragraph. How did you decide which costs to include in your estimations? How confident are you in your comparison? How meaningful is your answer? How might that purely financial information affect the choice to rent or buy a home in your chosen location?